Diebold voting machines

Of course, there are many different types of voting machines in the ., and they generally fall into one of four categories: punch card voting systems, optical scan paper ballot systems, direct recording electronic systems, or other ballot marking devices and systems. Different states tend to have different setups, but according to the Pew Research Center , for the 2016 presidential election, 75 percent of registered . voters lived in districts with either optical-scan ballots (read by machines) or direct-recording electronic systems (think touchscreens). 

"Diebold Election Systems (DES) has hired Ogilvy PR to burnish the company's image and the benefits of electronic voting in California," PR Week reported in August 2005. [18] The state had decertified one of DES' e-voting machines the previous year [19] , and the company wanted to ensure that their "story is told" and that voters "understand the technology," said Ogilvy's Michael Law , who heads DES' California work. According to PR Week , Ogilvy was researching public perceptions of DES, with an eye to developing messages "about the ease of electronic voting, particularly for voters who do not speak English, as well as for handicapped voters."

In January and February 2004, a whistleblower named Stephen Heller brought to light memos from Jones Day , Diebold's attorneys, informing Diebold that they were in breach of California law by continuing to use illegal and uncertified software in California voting machines. California Attorney General Bill Lockyer filed civil and criminal suits against the company, which were dropped when Diebold settled out of court for $ million. In February 2006, Heller was charged with three felonies for this action. [36] [37] On November 20, 2006, Heller made a plea agreement to pay $10,000 to Jones Day, write an apology, and receive three years probation. [38]

Richard Hayes Phillips has been the leading investigator of the fraudulent 2004 presidential election in Ohio. His work was relied upon by John Conyers in  challenging the Ohio electors in Congress,  by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. in his article for Rolling Stone magazine,  and by Algenon L. Marbley in issuing his  federal court order protecting  the ballots from destruction. Assisted by teams of volunteers equipped  with digital cameras, Phillips amassed some 30,000 images  of forensic  evidence. Then he analyzed it all himself, examining 126,000 ballots,  127 poll books, and 141 voter signature books from 18 counties in Ohio.  

Diebold voting machines

diebold voting machines

Richard Hayes Phillips has been the leading investigator of the fraudulent 2004 presidential election in Ohio. His work was relied upon by John Conyers in  challenging the Ohio electors in Congress,  by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. in his article for Rolling Stone magazine,  and by Algenon L. Marbley in issuing his  federal court order protecting  the ballots from destruction. Assisted by teams of volunteers equipped  with digital cameras, Phillips amassed some 30,000 images  of forensic  evidence. Then he analyzed it all himself, examining 126,000 ballots,  127 poll books, and 141 voter signature books from 18 counties in Ohio.  

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