Haloperidol for nausea dose

 As well as managing the actual nausea and vomiting, it is essential that the consequences are considered. Individuals with protracted nausea and vomiting are likely to have poor control of other symptoms (particularly if they are unable to manage their usual medication) and usually have reduced oral intake of food and fluid – contributing to weight loss and fatigue. The potential for significant dehydration and hypokalaemia must be borne in mind along with the potential for increased adverse drug reactions from relatively commonly prescribed medication such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), angiotensin-converting enzyme , and diuretics which may require to be temporarily discontinued until vomiting is controlled.

3 to 12 years and 15 to 40 kg:
-Initial dose: mg/day orally in 2 to 3 divided doses
-Maintenance dose: to mg/kg/day

Comments:
-The daily dose may be increased every 5 to 7 days in mg increments.
-There is little evidence that behavior improvement is further enhanced by doses greater than 6 mg/day.
-Limitation of use: Treatment should be reserved for patients with severe behavior problems and/or hyperactive children only after failure to respond to psychotherapy or medications (other than antipsychotics).

Uses:
-Treatment of severe behavior problems in children, including combative, explosive hyperexcitability not accounted for by immediate provocation
-Short-term treatment of hyperactive children with excessive motor activity and accompanying conduct disorder with impulsivity, difficulty sustaining attention, aggressiveness, mood lability, and/or poor frustration tolerance.

As with all antipsychotic agents HALDOL has been associated with persistent dyskinesias. Tardive dyskinesia, a syndrome consisting of potentially irreversible, involuntary , dyskinetic movements, may appear in some patients on long-term therapy or may occur after drug therapy has been discontinued. The risk appears to be greater in elderly patients on high-dose therapy, especially females. The symptoms are persistent and in some patients appear irreversible. The syndrome is characterized by rhythmical involuntary movements of tongue, face, mouth or jaw (., protrusion of tongue, puffing of cheeks, puckering of mouth, chewing movements). Sometimes these may be accompanied by involuntary movements of extremities and the trunk.

Anti-Parkinson Agents (Dopamine Agonist): May diminish the therapeutic effect of Antipsychotic Agents (First Generation [Typical]). Antipsychotic Agents (First Generation [Typical]) may diminish the therapeutic effect of Anti-Parkinson Agents (Dopamine Agonist). Management: Avoid concomitant therapy if possible and monitor for decreased effects of both agents when these combinations cannot be avoided. Atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine and quetiapine may be less likely to reduce the effects of anti-Parkinson agents. Consider therapy modification

The influence of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of haloperidol has not been evaluated. About one-third of a haloperidol dose is excreted in urine, mostly as metabolites. Less than 3% of administered haloperidol is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Haloperidol metabolites are not considered to make a significant contribution to its activity, although for the reduced metabolite of haloperidol, back-conversion to haloperidol cannot be fully ruled out. Even though impairment of renal function is not expected to affect haloperidol elimination to a clinically relevant extent, caution is advised in patients with renal impairment, and especially those with severe impairment, due to the long half-life of haloperidol and its reduced metabolite, and the possibility of accumulation (see section ).

Haloperidol for nausea dose

haloperidol for nausea dose

Anti-Parkinson Agents (Dopamine Agonist): May diminish the therapeutic effect of Antipsychotic Agents (First Generation [Typical]). Antipsychotic Agents (First Generation [Typical]) may diminish the therapeutic effect of Anti-Parkinson Agents (Dopamine Agonist). Management: Avoid concomitant therapy if possible and monitor for decreased effects of both agents when these combinations cannot be avoided. Atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine and quetiapine may be less likely to reduce the effects of anti-Parkinson agents. Consider therapy modification

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