Lean cycle time

I am working on implementing OEE in one of our machines that makes centertubes for automotive oil filters. The steel is rolled and each part number has specific diameter and length. However, the run-rates vary for each part numbers. I am somewhat able to calculate Takt time for each part number based on the standard run-rate. However, the problem for me is to determine Ideal Cycle Time. The machine can run as fast as 65 PPM for one part number while it runs as slow as 13 PPM for some other part number. In this case, what would be the optimal way to calculate Ideal Cycle Time for each part numbers? As you know, Ideal Cycle time is required to calculate Performance Metric of OEE.

Thanks for clearing up a general misconception. I myself used the term incorrectly for a while, then realized the difference – as you put it so clearly – and now I make sure to stress the distinction so others will not have the same confusion I did. In manufacturing, it may be self-evident, but in a service industry without automated / regulated flow, the terms are similar enough that it’s easy to be confused if you don’t start with a good definition. Thanks for giving us that and a good example as well,
Sue K.

Frederick Winslow Taylor , the father of scientific management , introduced what are now called standardization and best practice deployment. In Principles of Scientific Management , (1911), Taylor said: "And whenever a workman proposes an improvement, it should be the policy of the management to make a careful analysis of the new method, and if necessary conduct a series of experiments to determine accurately the relative merit of the new suggestion and of the old standard. And whenever the new method is found to be markedly superior to the old, it should be adopted as the standard for the whole establishment."

Facilities (land, buildings, equipment) provide the physical capability to add value and create products. The most common manifestation of facility planning (or lack thereof) is the Plant Layout . An effective layout incorporates and enables the manufacturing strategy on which it is based. Lean strategy starts with workflow and workflow is the result of process and layout. Mr. Lee has authored two books and many articles on Plant Layout and Facility Planning. His approach is organized, practical and systematic.

Joel – Thanks for the question! You’ll have to forgive me, as it’s been a few years since I read the book. And please don’t take any offense to what I am about to say . . I greatly respect the work that authors pour into these books and what people find useful and inspirig. That being said, if my memory serves me correctly, I thought the book was good, but not exceptional. I thought it spent a great deal of page space trying to “sell” or “market” lean to the reader, at the expense of depth into most of the topics. Second, the book collated a lot of information in one place, but I don’t think it added anything new to the study. Most of the books on my list were the either the first (or the best) at documenting very important components of Lean Thinking / The Toyota Production System. “Lean Transformation” is a good book for the novice looking to start their journey (although, I believe Pascal Dennis’book “Lean Production Simplified” is a better resource for the beginner), but doesn’t crack my personal top 10. Thanks again!

Lean cycle time

lean cycle time

Facilities (land, buildings, equipment) provide the physical capability to add value and create products. The most common manifestation of facility planning (or lack thereof) is the Plant Layout . An effective layout incorporates and enables the manufacturing strategy on which it is based. Lean strategy starts with workflow and workflow is the result of process and layout. Mr. Lee has authored two books and many articles on Plant Layout and Facility Planning. His approach is organized, practical and systematic.

Media:

lean cycle timelean cycle timelean cycle timelean cycle timelean cycle time

http://buy-steroids.org